Ph.D in political Science and International Relations. Intersectional Feminist. Refugee. Woman of colour. Secular. Atheist. Advocate for LGBTQi
+ people. Supporter of trans people, particularly trans women!
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/

breelifts:

socialjusticekoolaid:

Protesters from across St Louis turned up and turned out for the first St Louis County Council Meeting since Mike Brown’s Death. (Part I)

The St Louis County Council wasn’t as bad as Ferguson’s Council, but still very few answers and virtually no accountability from the folks who unleashed unholy hell on the residents of Ferguson, following Brown’s murder. #staywoke #farfromover

KEEP POSTING I NEED TO KNOW! DONT STOP POSTING ABOUT THIS. IT IS NOT OVER!

This is so important and empowering. Sharing in solidarity and in gratitude. 

delilahsdawson:

madamecuratrix:

seraphica:

Rohit Bal’s collection for India Bridal Fashion Week - absolutely stunning, and (in my opinion) way more interesting and personal than current western trends.

Glorious. Just exquisite design and craftsmanship. It feels like the opulence of Imperial Russia combined with traditional Indian cuts and motifs.

Last skirt on the left. I could take over the world, wearing that.

As feminists it is ESSENTIAL that we remain self critical, and that we need to realize that just because a concept makes us feel uncomfortable it does not mean that our discomfort is justified in relation to race issues and discussions with people of colour, or with those more oppressed, such as trans women or disAbled people for instance. This application of self awareness and critical self reflection is something that we should ALL apply to our lives, to our attitudes, our values, the conversations we have, the behaviours we engage with and the concepts that we consume and reproduce. 
Asking white feminists or people to check their privileges is not about excluding white women’s voices, but rather about expanding the discussion and realizing that there are areas in which white women can be more supportive of women of colour. It is not about being exclusionary, or showing that “my problems are more significant or important than yours”, but rather about being intersectional and realizing and acknowledging that within the overall feminist movement there has been a lot of racism and marginalization of women of colour and their voices. 
For instance, I am a Middle Eastern woman but I recognize that I have IMMENSE privileges over others, white or women of colour. An example of this is that I have a Ph.D in political science and international relations, which means that I have had the PRIVILEGE to continue with my education, not to mention having space, time, support, finances and mental and physical capacity to have access to education and to finish successfully. Part of me checking my privileges in this regard is not to rely too much on theory and to give space and respect to women’s daily lived experiences and acknowledging that just because someone has not had access to formal education does not mean that they are ignorant of feminist theory or history, or that if someone does show lack of knowledge that this does not mean that they are ignorant or misinformed; this requires me to stop at times and check my privileges; this allows me to engage with others, hopefully, in a way that is respectful, inclusive, aware and informed. Another immense privilege that I have is that my skin tone is comparatively “lighter” as opposed to say a black woman who will automatically face social, economic and political disadvantages. By me, as a WoC acknowledging that my skin tone gives me certain privileges over my counter parts I am not denying or being denied my experiences of oppression; but rather I am acknowledging that the scope for oppression, silencing and marginalization is wider than my personal experiences as informed by my experiences based on my race, gender, sexual orientation, economic status, education level, size and Ability. We also need to acknowledge that there IS a hierarchy of privileges in our feminist movement; and that denying that this exists has limited our effectiveness in the past. This is why black women, for instance, feel more comfortable with labelling themselves as Womenist rather than feminist. Such women have LEGITIMATE grievances and denying that is harmful and exclusionary and anti-feminist. There is NO denying that we all experience injustices as women; but by acknowledging that “others are more oppressed than I am” I am expanding my humanity, my humility, my education, self awareness, my love for others, especially women. And, if we are not approaching our feminism from a place of love, for those who are oppressed and abused, silenced and marginalized then WHY are we feminists? We have an immense capacity for empathy and love and as a Middle Eastern woman when I acknowledge and check my particular privileges I am made all the better a feminist, a human and a woman for it. My feminist ideology first and foremost comes from a place of love and hope that we are all growing together, that we are flawed because of the different systems that we have grown in, but that we have IMMENSE capacity to grow and develop and become more informed and inclusive 

As feminists it is ESSENTIAL that we remain self critical, and that we need to realize that just because a concept makes us feel uncomfortable it does not mean that our discomfort is justified in relation to race issues and discussions with people of colour, or with those more oppressed, such as trans women or disAbled people for instance. This application of self awareness and critical self reflection is something that we should ALL apply to our lives, to our attitudes, our values, the conversations we have, the behaviours we engage with and the concepts that we consume and reproduce. 

Asking white feminists or people to check their privileges is not about excluding white women’s voices, but rather about expanding the discussion and realizing that there are areas in which white women can be more supportive of women of colour. It is not about being exclusionary, or showing that “my problems are more significant or important than yours”, but rather about being intersectional and realizing and acknowledging that within the overall feminist movement there has been a lot of racism and marginalization of women of colour and their voices. 

For instance, I am a Middle Eastern woman but I recognize that I have IMMENSE privileges over others, white or women of colour. An example of this is that I have a Ph.D in political science and international relations, which means that I have had the PRIVILEGE to continue with my education, not to mention having space, time, support, finances and mental and physical capacity to have access to education and to finish successfully. Part of me checking my privileges in this regard is not to rely too much on theory and to give space and respect to women’s daily lived experiences and acknowledging that just because someone has not had access to formal education does not mean that they are ignorant of feminist theory or history, or that if someone does show lack of knowledge that this does not mean that they are ignorant or misinformed; this requires me to stop at times and check my privileges; this allows me to engage with others, hopefully, in a way that is respectful, inclusive, aware and informed. 

Another immense privilege that I have is that my skin tone is comparatively “lighter” as opposed to say a black woman who will automatically face social, economic and political disadvantages. By me, as a WoC acknowledging that my skin tone gives me certain privileges over my counter parts I am not denying or being denied my experiences of oppression; but rather I am acknowledging that the scope for oppression, silencing and marginalization is wider than my personal experiences as informed by my experiences based on my race, gender, sexual orientation, economic status, education level, size and Ability. 

We also need to acknowledge that there IS a hierarchy of privileges in our feminist movement; and that denying that this exists has limited our effectiveness in the past. This is why black women, for instance, feel more comfortable with labelling themselves as Womenist rather than feminist. Such women have LEGITIMATE grievances and denying that is harmful and exclusionary and anti-feminist. 

There is NO denying that we all experience injustices as women; but by acknowledging that “others are more oppressed than I am” I am expanding my humanity, my humility, my education, self awareness, my love for others, especially women. 

And, if we are not approaching our feminism from a place of love, for those who are oppressed and abused, silenced and marginalized then WHY are we feminists? We have an immense capacity for empathy and love and as a Middle Eastern woman when I acknowledge and check my particular privileges I am made all the better a feminist, a human and a woman for it. My feminist ideology first and foremost comes from a place of love and hope that we are all growing together, that we are flawed because of the different systems that we have grown in, but that we have IMMENSE capacity to grow and develop and become more informed and inclusive 

“One of Delawer’s most recognised pieces within the worldwide art community is his interpretation of the iconic photograph of Halabja victims Omer Xawer and his son; the photo of deceased local baker Omer clutching on to his son on a side road in Halabja was captured by an Iranian photographer shortly after their deaths. The painting titled “Even Angels Cried” pays homage to the town of Halabja that was subjected to a chemical gas attack under the orders of Saddam Hussein on 16th March 1988, which resulted in the deaths of over 5000 innocent men, children and women. On the 26th anniversary of the genocide, Delawer adds “Halabja’s massacre was one of the worst acts of genocide that has occurred in the 20th century against my Kurdish people, it should stay as a black spot in the history of this hypocritical world that still chooses to ignore our rights.”

One of Delawer’s most recognised pieces within the worldwide art community is his interpretation of the iconic photograph of Halabja victims Omer Xawer and his son; the photo of deceased local baker Omer clutching on to his son on a side road in Halabja was captured by an Iranian photographer shortly after their deaths. The painting titled “Even Angels Cried” pays homage to the town of Halabja that was subjected to a chemical gas attack under the orders of Saddam Hussein on 16th March 1988, which resulted in the deaths of over 5000 innocent men, children and women. On the 26th anniversary of the genocide, Delawer adds “Halabja’s massacre was one of the worst acts of genocide that has occurred in the 20th century against my Kurdish people, it should stay as a black spot in the history of this hypocritical world that still chooses to ignore our rights.”